analyze how social classes developed in your societies.

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Introduction: After you completed your ideal two paragraph Introduction in week three or revised and edited this Introduction which I require you to include in this Milestone II assignment for my additional comments, you are ready to discuss the remaining critical elements. If you need to polish your Introduction, please refer to the Milestone One assignment guidelines and rubrics and to my related Milestone One instructional discussion lecture in the GQ Forum, the latter in which I offer step-by-step guidance and additional instruction to help you write this important foundation of your historical analysis essay. But please heed my comments in your Milestone One and edit this Introduction, if necessary, before you include it in this Milestone Two assignment.
Section II A, i, ii, iii, iv: “The Structure of Complex Societies:” How the environment contributed to the development of societies: Next, in the paragraph following your two-paragraph Introduction, discuss how the environment contributed to drive people to organize themselves into groups called societies. Do not be specific to your societies; however, you may be specific to the world regions in which your societies developed. Environmental conditions may have been the waterways on which they lived; it may have been the weather. It may have been the composition of the soil, or it may have been other things, e.g., impact from other societies, animal life, increased population, etc. This section relates to the impact from the environment only. Then, name some social structures these unnamed early societies developed, and in one or two sentences only, discuss how these structures helped to sustain a society’s livelihood. Make it easy on yourselves–name the structures the rubrics require you to analyze, as well as any others you may choose to name. Do not overthink here with lots of superfluous details—keep it short and concise. Please be sure to integrate details from primary and scholarly secondary sources into your analysis of this section—examples here may include details from the ancient Hellene historian Herodotus’ (ca. 484-425 BCE) Histories (ca. 430 BCE) or the ancient Hellene geographer Stabo’s (63 BCE-ca. 24 CE) work, Geographica (ca.7 BCE) relating to the environment work as a primary resource relating to contributions the environment made in early world regions.
Section II B, I, ii, iii, iv: “Class and Gender Structure.” Next, in one or two sentences, analyze how social classes developed in your societies. Social stratifications developed as smaller societies grew. In ancient times, many of the people were peasants. Rulers developed their own class with other nobility taking their place in social class divisions, most often in leadership positions in government and/or politics, below the ruling class. Priests, whether they be pagan or otherwise, were often in their own class. Other classes developed as time evolved and as societies grew into states, dynasties, and empires. Then you will move ahead to examine the roles of the genders, i.e., what was the role women and men had in your societies. Women may have more rights in some societies than in others. Or were they confined to homemaking and childcare? What impact did unmarried women have, if any, e.g., relating to prostitution, and how did they benefit from this lifestyle? How did men exercise patriarchal rule? What role did their social status afford them in the community? These are some examples–you do not need to get carried away with lots of details—do not overthink it. But be sure to provide, in at least a few sentences at the very maximum, details relating to each of your societies about the social class divisions/stratification and gender issues. And analyze how these two social structures impacted these complex societies, e.g., how did they relate to each person’s participation in the group? Most importantly as the assignment guidelines require, be sure to integrate details from primary and scholarly secondary sources into your analysis of this social structure.
Section II C, I, ii, iii, iv: “Intellectual and Religious Structures.” Moving ahead, you are ready to discuss some details about the intellectual and religious social structures. Intellectual structures include art, laws, education, philosophies, literature, etc. You may discuss how specific philosophers impacted people’s thoughts and their role in society and/or government, even naming a philosopher who may relate to your focus/argument. You may examine and analyze scientific innovations. In this section, also, examine and analyze these societies’ religious practices, e.g., pagan worship/polytheistic practices, or monotheism. Were they pagan, Christian, Islam, etc.? Did they practice Hindu, Buddhist, Tao, or any other Far East religion/philosophies? Did they build temples, churches, shrines etc. to assist in their worship practices? Did they continue to follow mythological practices, astrology, etc. Be sure to analyze the similarities and contrasts between different societies, i.e., your societies or others. And do not forget that this section asks you to discuss tools and machines these people developed to help them maintain their societies–an often-forgotten subject contained as a subheading in this critical element. Again, please be sure to integrate details from primary and scholarly secondary sources, as required, into your analysis of this social structure.
Section II D, i, ii, iii, iv: “Economic and Political Structures.” Now you are ready to discuss the economic and political structures. A good example relating to the economic structure is trade. E.g., how did trade, within and outside societies, contribute to the livelihood of your societies and that of neighboring societies? As you discuss the political structure, be sure to satisfy the rubric by identifying at least three political events (perhaps one for each of your societies, all three relating to one society—however you wish to accomplish this). These may include wars, revolutions, conquest efforts, political conflicts etc. You may discuss political administrative efforts, political assemblies, political elections, etc. How did any of these political events or trends affect the development and/or demise of your societies, if applicable? About two sentences or so for each of your societies will suffice. Again, do not overthink. And be sure, again, to integrate details from primary and scholarly secondary sources, as required, into your analysis of one or both social structures.
End of analysis of the social structures: This completes your discussion of each of the social structures the assignment guidelines and rubrics require you to examine and analyze. You are not done yet. I suggest you review and edit often your text including the details in each of these sections, especially every time you reopen your assignment to write again—certainly, this is not something you can write effectively in one sitting. The ideal way to write these assignments is to research, examine, and analyze one section at a time, continuing to edit your text every time you reopen my assignment. If you are writing this assignment in one or two short sittings, you are setting yourself toward failure. And, as I noted above, it is important you recognize that you must integrate “both primary and secondary sources” into your work relating to the assignment guidelines sections A-D, sections iv. Therefore, you may need more than the minimum number of primary sources required for this assignment. If you are having difficulty identifying primary sources for these societies, ask me for help. If you are having difficulty understanding the difference between primary sources and scholarly secondary sources, please ask me for help. As you continue your analysis, you will address and analyze the next assignment guidelines’ section.
Section II E: Historical Perspective: If this type of an analysis is new to you as it was to me when I began my history studies, I suggest you do some research using your web search engine (Google, Yahoo, etc.) to research details about how to an historical analysis essay historical perspective. Historical perspectives are not a discussion of earlier history, which you do above relating to the social structures, and how these societies, their histories, and your analyses evolved and/or impacted the future. Its object is not to make your reader more aware of the past as much as it is to contribute to their understanding of the present historical era you are examining or to the future of these societies’ development and/or demise. E.g., what may they have left behind for future societies as they developed? So, in this section, look to the future rather than focus on the past. Discuss progress. You already discussed its earliest phases of history; now focus on its evolution to sharpen the readers’ vision of these societies’ shift in their present historical time or later. Did their conquests lead to the development of other societies? Did they rule harshly or assimilate other cultures into their culture or vice-versa? Did your societies’ social structures contribute to the development or increased growth of other societies? How did these things impact your societies’ futures? And how did these societies, as a whole or addressing only yours, contribute to the eventual development of nation-states, (the developing states of the future), e.g., new states, more-so, throughout the developing Western world. Or you may analyze impacts on other developing states in the Eastern world, i.e., different parts of Europe, the Near East, the Americas, in other areas of Africa, or the continuing development of new states in the Far East? Thus, this discussion is about understanding the social structures you examine and analyzed, and how they may have contributed to the lives of the people of your societies and how they shaped their future and/or the future of later societies, i.e., larger states, nation-states, etc. This is something you cannot address by writing a quick few sentence. It takes more research.
Other essay details, e.g., the use of Turabian style, etc.: SNHU requires you to include a title page using Turabian style only. Include Turabian style page formatting—specific to this writing style. Do not forget to include the required dates when you introduce historical eras, other societies, people, and events. Lastly, be sure to provide evidence to support your details and facts, following the specific instructions I offer in my related Turabian style instructional discussion lectures, using in-text footnote numbers that you will format using Word. See the related discussion lecture for instructions how to accomplish this. Word, as I noted in my related Turabian discussion, will add the consecutively numbered footnote where you place your cursor in your text followings you sentence terminal punctuation, and Word will add the corresponding footnote for the N entries at the bottom of the same page formatted correctly using Turabian style. Be sure to include footnote entries only; we are not using end notes in this class. Later, you will include all the different sources you included in your N entries in your separate B page following your text, arranged alphabetically, being careful to format these noting the differences between the format of B entries from corresponding N entries—there are notable differences. The above referenced Turabian style instructional discussion lectures provide many details. Do not integrate any MLA or APA formatting in this Turabian style essay—these will result in grade point losses.

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